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Pumpkin and Cashew Dip

By | Recipes | No Comments

Pumpkins! They thrived this year, and we had hundreds of them.

We’ve had pumpkin in salads, roasts, desserts…and this week since we also have loads of violet cauliflower, which is gorgeous eaten raw with a decent dip, I’ve just made a pumpkin and cashew dip.

Here’s the recipe:

About half a kilo of pumpkin and sweet potato, roasted. You can use pumpkin alone, but we just happened to have them both leftover after a roast. If you are purposefully roasting the pumpkin to make the dip you’ll need to peel, seed and dice the pumpkin, then roast at 180C for about half an hour.

1/2 Cup Cashews…or another nut if you prefer

2 Tbsp Seasoning. I used YIAH Cinco Pepper Enchilada seasoning (which is completely herbs and spices). Otherwise Moroccan Seasoning is a good option.

3/4 Cup greek yoghurt. Try coconut yoghurt if you’re going dairy free

Method: Using a blender or food processor, mix all ingredients until smooth.

Simple, isn’t it?

 

Market Gardening- What About Food Waste?

By | Market Garden | One Comment

Many of you have seen it on the ABC’s War On Waste series. Or you’ve seen it with your own eyes and through your own research….modern agriculture practices, combined with stringent supermarket criteria, produce a LOT of food waste.

Woolworths made a step in the right direction, with their The Odd Bunch vegetable/fruit selections. We used to buy them before we went organic, and were pleased to see that at least some of the stranger or undersized looking produce items were making it to the shelf!

But what about in the market garden setting? What food waste do we produce, and what do we do with waste?

For starters, we create very little food waste. You can never predict exactly how many lettuce will sell, or how many people will want cauliflower next week, but you can get a rough idea and plant accordingly. Rick puts a decent effort into crop planning (his engineer traits come out in this- you should see the spread sheets!) and as a result our production is fairly well suited to customer demand.

Sometimes there will be a glut. Right now it’s cos lettuce, most likely because it’s winter and people aren’t really eating cold salads and aren’t used to using cos lettuce in any other way. What do we do with the surplus?

Generally one of three things:

-Feed the sheep. The sheep LOVE lettuce, cabbage…even pumpkin as we discovered this week. And as we’ve not had decent rain for months, our paddock is quite depleted of pasture. The surplus lettuce are saving us from buying lucerne for the sheep.

  • Feed the chickens and ducks. Man can not live by bread alone, just as the fowl can’t live bye grain alone. They adore greens, and are daily the recipients of extra or damaged produce. Thanks to all these greens, our eggs have beautiful rich orange yolks, and the fowl are in good health.
  • Return the crop to the soil. I used to struggle with this as it seems like waste, when you’ve been brought up not to waste food! But there’s nothing wasteful about enriching your soil. Sometimes we even grow a green manure crop, purely to mow back into the soil and boost the soil structure and nutrient levels. Presently we have a half a row of overgrown bok choi and mesclun mix. Rick actually likes it when this occurs, because we started out with heavy black clay soil. It was like trying to dig into a big block of modelling clay. Organic matter was desperately needed to remedy this soil, and 18 months later, here we are with completely different soil structure. It makes sense that if you are constantly removing produce from the soil, that you should also be often giving back to the soil.

Rick is also a big fan of doing any trimming of veg (beet greens, brassica leaves etc) at the harvest site, so all those greens go right back to the soil.

The only time food ‘waste’ leaves our property is when I offer it for sale as pet greens, or on odd occasions might sell seconds cabbage for sauerkraut.

A completely different story to mass agriculture isn’t it? And as for undersize or unusually shaped produce, we’re finding that we have less and less of that as our soil improves, but what we do have can still be used. If I have a few cabbages that are undersized, I can ask a customer if they mind having 2 smaller cabbages rather than one big one. Or I can add a few extra beets to the bunch if they’re little. It’s a small enough business that we can talk directly to the customers about their produce and work together to reduce the chance of food waste.

Beeswax Wraps and Cold Process Soap Making Workshop

By | Farm Gate Stall | No Comments

May at Simple Living Toowoomba…

This month SLT are offering two classes in one, DIY beeswax wraps with Suanne from Green Dandelion, and cold process soap making with me.

If you haven’t heard about beeswax wraps, they’re an eco friendly alternative to glad wrap. Much better looking than glad wrap too! Suanne will even have kits available for sale on the day with the wax/resin mix so you can go home and make your own. Suanne is regularly at local farmer’s markets and the like selling not only her beautiful wraps, but also other ‘green’ solutions for you home.

And soap making, like I’ve said before, is so much easier than you think and can be made with ingredients from the supermarket. No need to order pricey unusual ingredients (unless you want to go down that path). Homemade soap is also very allergy friendly. I have yet to meet a person, no matter how bad the eczema, who reacts to basic homemade soap. I’ll have some soap available for sale on the day.

This class will take place on Saturday 26th May, 9:45am-Midday at 13-15 Blake St, Wilsonton, 4350. It’s going to be capped at about 30-35 participants.

Cost is $5 per adult (need cash as there’s no electronic payment facilities), which is amazing value. Soapmaking will be up first and we’ll start at 10am sharp, so please be on time! Suanne will then start her wraps demonstration at around 11am.

To RSVP, email Michele at simplelivingtoowoomba@gmail.com

Seasonal Mixed Box – A Value Comparison

By | Farm Gate Stall | One Comment

We get both- customers who want specific produce each order, and customers who just want a box of whatever is fresh and seasonal.

One customer, upon taking home her first $50 mixed box, decided to list and weigh every item in her box and find out how the value compared to buying the same items organically at the supermarket. I was really excited by this, it’s one of those things I probably wouldn’t get around to doing at the moment, but am very interested to see the results of.

So I’ve just received the list this customer wrote, and will share it with you so you too can see how our seasonal mixed boxes compare with supermarket buying.

NOTE: Contents of seasonal mixed boxes change frequently, depending on what’s in season and how much of each item we have available.

This customer was not asked to do this, she just happens to be very thrifty and wanted to know for herself what kind of value she was getting.

It’s also worth noting when you buy a seasonal box, I ALWAYS put more than the dollar value you paid in there, ie if you buy a $50 box, I’ll put at least another $5-$10 worth of our produce in there.

Both Coles and Woolworths online were used for her comparisons, as neither supermarket stocked everything in her box from Birdsong. The comparisons are made with Organic produce (except for the eggplant and cucumber, which she could not find organically from supermarkets at the time).

 

Ok, here it is:

Item                                                Supermarket Price     Total

1050g Dutch Cream Potatoes    $4/kg                           $4.20

995g Sweet Potato                        $10/kg                        $9.95

630g Salad Onion                         $7/kg                          $4.45

670g Butternut Pumpkin            $4/kg                          $2.68

1560g Tomatoes                            $17.50/kg                  $27.30

856g Corn, Small Cobs                $14/kg                        $11.97

425g Squash                                  $9/kg                          $3.82

777g Capsicum                              $9/kg                          $6.99

420g Purple Beans                      $18/kg                         $7.56

1305g Zucchini                             $9/kg                           $11.75

954g Eggplant                              $8/kg (non organic) $7.63

1140g Lebanese Cucumber        $5/kg (non organic)  $5.95

700g Beetroot                               $9/kg                           $6.30

808g Carrots                                 $6/kg                           $4.85

30g Herbs                                                                            $3

12.3kg Produce (Equivalent $4.06/kg)      TOTAL: $118.11

 

Wow, I hadn’t realised the price difference would be so huge!

Organic Dried Fruit/Nuts/Seeds/Flours

By | Farm Gate Stall | 4 Comments

As many of you know, we supplement out produce range with some organic dried fruit, nuts, seeds, oils and sometimes flours.

Some of these items, like coconut sugar and pepitas have been selling out fast lately! We’re looking at ordering in more organic pantry items like these soon and we’re open to suggestions. What would you like to see in our web store?

It’s been a while since we’ve had dried fruit, so I’m considering giving organic figs a go. The wholesaler we deal with has a huge variety and if there’s something you’d like to be able to buy through us (and we keep the prices as reasonable as we can), then leave a comment or contact us and let us know your suggestions.

Earth Day 2018 and a big thank you to those who are helping us reduce plastic waste!

By | Market Garden | No Comments

It’s interesting timing. I was just thinking this past week that in the approximately 18 months we’ve been operating, we haven’t had to order more plastic bags and containers. At the start Rick bought a couple of boxes of tomato punnets and various sized bags for packing produce. You’d think after all those orders we’ve processed, we’d have needed more plastic.

BUT, we happen to have a wonderful clientele that are more than happy to have their veg orders packed into cardboard boxes, which can be recycled. It’s only small items like beans, cherry tomatoes and the organic dry goods we sell that we’ve been using plastic packaging for. And I hope as time goes on we’ll find sustainable and practical solutions for those items…so we can eradicate the plastic altogether.

April 22nd is Earth Day, and I want to thank you all for helping Birdsong Market Garden reduce plastic waste by accepting your orders in cardboard boxes 🙂 It must be thousands of plastic bags that are not in local landfill, because you’ve been so cooperative with sustainable packing options.

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Birdsong Farm Tour, Saturday April 28th

By | Market Garden | No Comments

Finally, we’ve got a farm tour happening!

We can thank Simple Living Toowoomba for getting us organised with that.

When: Saturday 28th April, 10am-Midday

Where: 118 Boundary St, Cranley

Cost: $5 per adult. Children are welcome, just keep an eye on them. I hope to have the lawn tamed before the day, but at the moment it’s long and we do get the occasional eastern brown snake! Cost includes light refreshments after the tour.

What: A walk around the market garden with Farmer Rick, and a chance to see how we go about Nutrition farming and ask lots of questions 🙂

RSVP: Please email Michele at simplelivingtoowoomba@gmail.com to book in for the tour.

NOTE: If it rains, the tour will be cancelled, as our garden becomes a sticky black-clay mess! Also, you might like to wear enclosed shoes (unless you like to earth-out).

And yes, you can purchase produce on the day if you like.

Thai Cashew Chicken

By | Recipes | No Comments

Happy Saturday! It’s our day off, and today was one of those lovely days where we had nothing planned. So there’s been time to potter around in the kitchen.

Chilies abound at the moment, so I’ve been trying a few Thai recipes, and thought I’d share this one with you…

Thai Cashew Chicken…with coconut rice

Coconut Rice: 2 C basmati rice

4C liquid (I use 1 can of organic coconut cream and make the rest of the liquid up with chicken broth)

Chicken: 500g chicken (we used organic chicken thighs), chopped to your preferred size

2-3 Tbsp plain flour

1/3 cup macadamia oil (if you don’t have macadamia, use another oil with a mild flavour)

Vegetables: 1 Tbsp garlic, crushed or finely chopped

1 small tropea red onion, sliced length ways into wedges

5-6 Thai chilies, finely chopped

1 C raw cashews

1 C capsicums, julienned

1 C carrots, julienned

2 shallots, finely sliced

Sauce: 2 Tbsp soy sauce

1 Tbsp oyster sauce

1/2 tsp ground pepper

Dash of salt

Dash of honey

1 C chicken broth/stock

2 Tbsp cornflour

Method:

Get your rice going first. I put the rice and liquid in the saucepan and cook, absorption method, with the lid on. Just keep an eye on the rice to make sure the heat is shut off when the liquid gets low.

Mix your sauce ingredients in a jar and set aside.

Pour you oil into a wok or large frypan and heat. While that is heating, toss your chopped chicken in the flour to coat.

Fry the raw cashews until they start to brown, then remove with a slotted spoon and set aside.

Now add your floured chicken and the chili to the hot oil in the pan and fry until golden and delicious. Remove the chicken from the oil and set aside.

To that same oil, add all your veg except the shallots and fry until the onion is translucent.

Add your sauce and while that cooks through, get your cornflour and mix with a little water and add this to the pan to thicken the sauce.

Your chicken and cashews can now get back in the pan. Stir until the sauce has coated everything and then add your shallots for just a minute or two of cooking before you serve.

I liked the heat level of this combo. It was mild enough that flavours other than heat could be enjoyed, but hot enough to have a kick to it 🙂 If you love heat and don’t have children to accommodate, you might like to add more chili.

Confessions of a Farmer’s Wife

By | Nutrition | 2 Comments

He looks like I’ve been feeling…pooped! Here’s an inside look at life at Birdsong lately…hahaha.

We had a lovely 5 days away at the coast, and not the overcrowded QLD coast, but a kind of remote little coastal village in NSW. It was bliss. We swam, read books and generally recovered from the fast pace life that the market garden creates. The children think it’s wonderful, partly because of the beach, and partly because it’s the only time I’ll ever let them eat cocoa pops!

But then we had to come back to reality. I got hit with hayfever (maybe the change of seasons brought on new pollen in the air…I don’t know). Then started having very disturbed sleep, and less than a week after the holiday was not coping. Rick’s got a lot of engineering work on at the moment so I end up with more farm work. Like, all of the harvesting, packing and sales. On top of homeschooling 5 of our 6 children (but thank God I have Rick’s mum helping me with that this year), making all our meals from scratch and managing all the other needs and distractions that come up. It was really too much.

Then we had other issues, like the lawn is starting to look a bit Amazonian, but the lawn mower, ride on mower and then the 2 wheel tractor all stopped working! The 2 wheel tractor was the saddest part. I was mowing with it (since the other equipment had broke down) and accidentally mowed over a bicycle tire that had been completely submerged in grass. That didn’t go down well, and broke the clutch. I felt terrible, because this was the first time I’d ever used the 2 wheel tractor…and because I’d repeatedly told the children not to leave their rubbish around the yard!). The 2 wheel tractor is an unusual piece of equipment from Europe, so parts are costly. Rick was already pretty disillusioned and considering giving up the farm just before that happened. He started pulling the tractor apart to find what went wrong and was very blessed to have our neighbour stop by and help him. It’s almost fixed now, phew.

Then came Friday. Friday is a huge day. I get up at dawn (that’s normal) and then get out in the market garden to harvest whatever else is needed for the delivery orders. Most of the packing is done Thursday arvo, so it’s not so stressful on the Friday morning. I have a very mature 9 year old who gets her 5 and 3 year old brothers fed and ready for the big day out while I work outside. Our 12 year old came out to help harvest. Most stock is ready to go in the cold room, but things like herbs are harvested to order. And leafy greens can’t be packed until the last minute.

Eventually all the boxes are ready (and I hope I haven’t missed anthing!). This week it was 8 boxes of veg, overflowing the boot of the van onto children’s laps! Then we start delivering. We try to get out of the house at 8am and need to be finished delivering by 9:15am for my eldest to have her piano lesson. While she’s there, the rest of us go grab some groceries, then collect her from piano and head straight to homeschool gymnastics. I really didn’t feel like being there this week, but once a fortnight the under 5’s have a class…and that was this week. My 3 year old was so excited that he’d get to use the gym equipment too that I didn’t have the heart to skip it on him. Then it’s lunch in the park with a stack of other homeschool families.

Next things start to slow down a bit and I drop the children off to my sisters for the afternoon so I can do any town errands by myself!

Busy. And I can totally understand why there aren’t more small farms and market gardens. It’s hard work, but doesn’t make enough money to hire help.

By the way, this was written more in a effort to help people understand some of what’s involved in small scale farming, not to have a whinge. Overall we have a great life, and I’m so thankful for the produce (and the opportunity to farm), as I doubt I’d have the energy to maintain this schedule without it!

Gran Elly Orchard Tours

By | Nutrition | No Comments

A number of you already buy apples from Dennis Angelino’s biologically organic farm. But for those who don’t know, Dennis is into remineralising the soil, like us. He’s opening up his farm at Thullimbah for tours on March 3/4 (Saturday/Sunday).

Sounds like a great family excursion, and opportunity to see what goes into apple farming and processing without poisons.

Contact Gran.Elly.Orchard@gmail.com for more info

Rain at Last!

By | Farm Gate Stall | No Comments

Hi 🙂

As you may have noticed on the web store, the range of produce is dwindling! There’s lots of crops out there, but until yesterday, we’d had no rain this year. So though we irrigate and the crops are plodding along, they haven’t been able to thrive. Yesterdays storm brought 14mm. A nice start.

The lack of rain isn’t just affecting the crops, it also affects the animals. Our sheep have eaten out their cell, so I let them out into the house yard the other day, completely intending to put them back soon….but I forgot and they ate most of our upcoming lettuce crop. Oops.

And the ducks/chickens…the laying has cut right back! So many birds, so few eggs. But Cinnamon, one of our bantams who was laying, just hatched 5 little chicks, as pictured. So cute, but it’s ducks we’re wanting to breed, not more chooks! And bantams at that (Rick thinks their little eggs are a waste of time). The children are excited though, they love babies.

Rick’s had some contract work happening, so farm work is minimal. But that’s a good thing while we’re waiting on more rain. When the range picks up again, Rick is wanting to add another delivery slot to our week. He goes into town every Wednesday morning to deliver to a restaurant, and could do a few home deliveries right after that (in Toowoomba, after 9:30am Wednesdays). So keep an eye on the website, he plans to add the delivery option as an item that you add to your cart.

I also have a contact in Harristown who already runs a fruit co-op and is willing to be a pickup point for orders. So if you’re in that area and are interested, let me know.

Enjoy your week,

Racheal

 

Balsamic BBQ Sauce

By | Recipes | No Comments

A while ago I posted the recipe for the best tomato sauce we’ve found…well that recipe is a great base for making your own BBQ sauce. It does still contain sugar, if that’s an issue for you, but it’s a lot more wholesome than store bought BBQ sauce!

Balsamic BBQ Sauce

3/4 Cup Tomato sauce

3/4 cup balsamic vinegar (we used organic balsamic from Wrays due to the fact that balsamic vinegar is made from grapes, which are a heavily sprayed crop unless you buy organic)

Garlic- 2-3 cloves of fresh garlic is great, but you can use 1Tbsp powdered or minced garlic if that’s what you have on hand

1/2 Tsp each of salt and pepper

1Tbsp Worcestershire sauce

1/4 cup coconut sugar (or organic raw sugar)

A nice easy recipe…all you do is mix all those ingredients in a medium saucepan over medium heat and simmer away for about 15 minutes, or until the sugar is dissolved and you have a consistency you’re happy with. Then pour into a clean bottle.

I couldn’t tell you precisely how long it lasts, because it’s consumed long before we have to get concerned with use by dates 🙂 But given the high level of vinegar and sugar, you should get at least 12 months of shelf life.

Our Experiences with Lavender Essential

By | Farm Gate Stall | No Comments
I’ve noticed a great deal of our customers are into alternative healing, and natural living…so I thought I’d share this with you 🙂
Lavender oil is one of the three oils that we’ve been using for a looong time. Not long after marrying Rick, he relayed to me the account of his mining mate who sustained a nasty hand injury that looked like it needed professional help at a hospital. The friend said, no, he had lavender essential oil, and to just watch how fast the gash healed. He said within 3 days it would be fine. So Rick did watch. And 3 days later, the wound was healing very nicely. No infection and no weeping etc. So we’d started buying lavender from the supermarket and keeping it on hand as we had more and more children, who naturally hurt themselves a lot.
My first chance at really putting lavender to the test was one afternoon when I had a particularly important phone call and the children had gone down to play at the pond. Before long, I’m hearing “MUM! MUM! There’s blood everywhere! Mum!” It was one of those calls that wasn’t easy to put down (a friend in a very emotional state), but when Charlotte was ushered inside, with blood literally pouring out of her finger, I had to tell the caller I had a serious injury to deal with! It turned out Micah had been ‘mowing the lawn’ near the pond with secatares, and Charlotte had stuck her finger right between the blades as he snipped. The result was that half of the tip of her finger was sliced through. I don’t like emergency rooms, and the fact that every time we’ve tried them we wait for hours to often find there’s not much they can do anyway. So I decided to try the lavender oil and bandages. Some bright spark gave us a first aid kit as a wedding gift (long time friend of Rick’s I think), so we had everything we needed. So that was it. I bandaged to stop the bleeding and when it had slowed down enough, dropped some lavender oil on the wound. Lavender speeds healing. I alternated treating the wound with tea tree oil too, as it is very effective at fighting infection. Thankfully it worked. He finger healed, and now, years later, there’s not even a scar. That’s impressive considering how much of her finger was sliced through!
A similar accident occurred about 2 years ago when our toddler went and played with tin sheeting (right before we were about to go out too). He deeply sliced the palm of his hand. I grabbed the lavender and tea tree again…and bandages of course. By now we knew butterfly closures were an item to keep in stock at our home! Two of the friends at the homeschool group we were attending that day were trained nurses, who suggested I take him to hospital for stitches. I drove home, praying about it…keen NOT to go to the hospital. I called Rick and he said to go with the oils. So we did. And once again, between lavender, tea tree and bandages, Jeremiah’s hand healed with no sign of scarring or infection.
Micah used to be our least hygienic child (Charlotte is in fierce competition with him for that title now!), and he contracted school sores. The first time it happened, we put him on antibiotics (the only time I’d ever done that with any of our children!). They left. But then they came back down the track, and this time I’d read that lavender and tea tree could combat school sores. So that’s what we did. I mixed the two oils in a spritzer bottle and sprayed his sores about twice a day. They left. And this time didn’t come back.
Flies really don’t like lavender. As most of you know, we keep sheep. We’ve had constant dog attacks on our flock, and one summer one of our best breeders was almost killed by a tear to the neck from one of the despised wild dogs. You could see inside her neck, it wasn’t pretty. But I hate to have an animal put down if there’s some chance it might recover. So we grabbed the lavender oil. Too much of it actually. You don’t ever need to use much, but we were hurrying to save her and Rick said “Pour it on!” I was too flustered to tell him that would be overkill, so just poured it on. The ewe dropped to the ground, shocked for a moment. But the lavender worked (we bandaged her neck also). It sped the healing, and repelled the flies, which are a threat to injured sheep, as they like to lay maggots in the wool of them. But she lived, never became fly blown and went on to have more twin lambs!
Lavender heals wounds, but what else?
Most of you have probably heard about it’s calming qualities. Especially on babies. When Archie had teething pain, I looked up in Modern Essentials what to try, and they said lavender oil across the jawbone. I did it, and it worked. Other times I’ve placed a drop of lavender on the back of the neck of distressed children, and found it calms them nicely.
One time we popped out the lavender in the park, when one of the children’s friends stepped on a bee and was stung. I put one drop on the bite site and she soon stopped crying and ran off with the others as though nothing had happened.
Lavender is also great for (brace yourself, it’s a long list!): calming agitation, allergies, anxiety, appetite loss, arrhythmia, atherosclerosis, bites/stings, blisters, boils, soothing breast pain, burns, cancer, chicken pox, club foot, concentration, convulsions, crying, cuts, dandruff, depression, diabetic sores, diaper rash, diuretic, dysmenorrhea, exhaustion, fever, gangrene, gas/flatulence, giardia, gnats, grief/sorrow, dry hair, hair loss, hay fever, hernia, herpes simplex, hyperactivity, impetigo, inflammation, insomnia, itching, jet lag, dry lips, mastitis, menopause, mental stress, mood swings, mosquito repellent, muscular paralysis, pain, parasympathetic nervous system stimulation, parkinson’s disease, phlebitis, physical stress, poison ivy/oak, post labour, postpartum depression, rashes, relaxation, rheumatoid arthritis, sedative, seizure, dry skin, skin ulcers, sleep, stress, stretch marks, sunburn, tachycardia, teeth grinding, teething pain, tension, thrush, ticks, leg ulcers, varicose ulcers, vertigo, withdrawal, worms, wounds, wrinkles.

Lavender wholesales at $28 for 15ml and is one of the top 10 oils to have in your home. I keep some in stock for those who are local and don’t have their own account with doterra.

One of those Days

By | Market Garden | One Comment

5am, time to get up. But where I’d normally get into the routine happily, with no dramas, today I felt like crying…or vomiting. All of a sudden the enormity of the tasks hit and the stress that comes with it.

Rick wants to aim for the markets this weekend, which is a good idea, but the actual work it takes to prepare for that is messy. Waking to the prospect of more harvesting and market prep was a sobering thought. If that was all we had to do, then it would be simple. But it’s not. There’s 6 children to organise and care for (they do a lot to help, but they are still young and need some motivation!), endless farm chores, food to prepare etc. Maybe I shouldn’t list everything off or I’ll get overwhelmed again!

From 5am-8pm I don’t really stop moving or working, except sometimes for half an hour in the arvo to lie down and read for a while…but that is usually interrupted by a child coming to ask a question or complain about one of their siblings to me.

Rick seemed to recognise the problem straight away, just by looking at me. I hadn’t said a word about what was wrong, I was just getting ready to go out and harvest when he gave me a hug and said “it’s ok, you don’t need to harvest anything or work out there.” Then he offered to pack orders for me today etc. What a relief! He feels this way sometimes too, but he’s a lot better at just sitting down and stopping for a while until the motivation comes back.

We live such a blessed life…loads of wholesome food, sunshine, fresh air, family, friends etc. But it is also a LOT of work…and we like work, but sometimes it gets overwhelming.

I’ve been reading Grow, Hunt, Cook by Rohan Anderson. He’s a guy who left his office job and deteriorating health and moved to a property where he and his family could live off the land and produce food for themselves…he talks a lot about the supermarket culture, and how detached people are from their food. Most people have no idea how much effort goes into feeding a person, or how long some produce takes to grow…or how long it takes to process! Especially with meat you find this. People are happy to eat meat, but not to pay much for it, generally. But there’s a lot of work in raising an animal and butchering it. And it’s pretty hard to look into the eyes of a sweet ewe for example, and then take it’s life. I can’t do it still. I can help butcher, but not with the actual kill. Picking up a roast at the supermarket totally detaches you from the time, effort etc that goes into that roast.

Anyway, now I’m rambling. I just thought this post might help people see some of the time and energy that goes into producing real food…and the realities of living this dream 🙂

A Higher Frequency

By | Farm Gate Stall | 2 Comments

Hello,
Ever heard of Tainio? Bruce Tainio, of Tainio Technology invented and built a machine called the BT3 Frequency Monitoring System. He wanted to measure the bio-electrical frequencies of soil nutrients and essential oils.

If you can remember back to school science lessons, you would have been told about how everything vibrates. Every element in the periodic table has a specific vibratory frequency.

Humans have a frequency, but it can vary so much depending on what state your health is in. Through measuring these frequencies it was found that a healthy person should have a frequency measuring around 62-68MHz.

But what if it’s less? When your frequency drops to about 58MHz, cold symptoms can manifest.

Flu symptoms start at 57MHz.

Candida at 55MHz

Cancer can begin when the body drops below 42MHz.

The process of dying begins at 25MHz and drops to zero when you’re officially dead.


So how can you change your frequency? First of all, it should be noted that processed/canned food measures 0MHz. It has no life force, the heat treatment has killed it all. It can give you energy, but not life-force.

Fresh herbs measure 20-27MHz

Even dry herbs measure 12-22MHz

Holding a cup of coffee was found to lower a person’s frequency by 8MHz!! And drinking the coffee lowered it by 14MHz.

So eating food that’s fresh as opposed to long-life, will go a long way towards boosting your frequency.


But then there are essential oils too. Tainio tried giving his coffee experiment ‘guinea pig’ a whiff of some quality essential oils after drinking the coffee. The subjects frequency was fully restored within a minute. He tried the same experiment with the coffee again, but left the person to their own devices to see how long restoration of frequency after the coffee would take without the use of essential oils. 3 days it took.

(I told Rick about this, and he can’t bear the thought of giving up coffee, so dabbed himself with peppermint oil which measures at 78MHz, after drinking his coffee!)


This is relatively recent technology and not all oils have been tested. But quality, properly distilled oils from healthy plants have some amazing frequencies. For example:

Rose 320MHz

Helichrysum 181MHz

Lavender 118 MHz

Melissa (lemon balm) 102MHz

Juniper 98MHz

Peppermint 78MHz

Basil 52MHz


And you can benefit from their frequency just by inhaling them!

One of the most important healing modalities of the oils is their ability to lift our bodily frequencies to levels where disease cannot exist” David Stewart Ph.D.


Food for thought…


PS All the above oils mentioned are available through doTerra and can either be ordered through me (I also keep a bunch of them in stock at wholesale prices), or I can set you up with your own wholesale account (no minimum buy required). Just ask if you’re interested.

Just remember that no oil or supplement is a substitute for a wholesome balanced diet. If you want to improve your health, look at your diet and habits first.

Shalom, Racheal

Happy New Year + Specials

By | Farm Gate Stall | No Comments

Happy New Year! We welcomed it in by….harvesting. Surprise, surprise!

By the way, we are open today (New Years Day).

To celebrate the new year, we’ve got some specials for you…

Zucchini $4/kg

Activated Almond meal, insecticide free $12/kg

Tomato 5kg bulk buy, $20

These specials are available while stocks last, or for the next week…whichever comes first 🙂

Have a lovely new years, and have fun dreaming about your goals for this year…I plan to learn more about herbs. While perusing the Minerals For the Genetic Code book, I noticed herbs are mineral powerhouses…with ppm (parts per million) of various minerals far higher than most other foods. So herbs are going as many dishes as possible!