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Highfields, Gowrie Junction Organic Home Deliveries??

By | Farm Gate Stall | No Comments

We live and farm so close to Gowrie Junction…4kms from the school. And Highfields is just around the corner also.

So, I’m gauging interest for a Highfields and Gowrie Junction delivery run. The same rules would apply as the Toowoomba run…one set delivery slot for orders $40+ and orders would need to be placed by the day before the delivery run.

Anyone interested? If so, please email me racheal@birdsongmarketgarden.com.au and I’ll figure out whether there’s enough interest to go ahead with this.

Pumpkin and Cashew Dip

By | Recipes | No Comments

Pumpkins! They thrived this year, and we had hundreds of them.

We’ve had pumpkin in salads, roasts, desserts…and this week since we also have loads of violet cauliflower, which is gorgeous eaten raw with a decent dip, I’ve just made a pumpkin and cashew dip.

Here’s the recipe:

About half a kilo of pumpkin and sweet potato, roasted. You can use pumpkin alone, but we just happened to have them both leftover after a roast. If you are purposefully roasting the pumpkin to make the dip you’ll need to peel, seed and dice the pumpkin, then roast at 180C for about half an hour.

1/2 Cup Cashews…or another nut if you prefer

2 Tbsp Seasoning. I used YIAH Cinco Pepper Enchilada seasoning (which is completely herbs and spices). Otherwise Moroccan Seasoning is a good option.

3/4 Cup greek yoghurt. Try coconut yoghurt if you’re going dairy free

Method: Using a blender or food processor, mix all ingredients until smooth.

Simple, isn’t it?

 

Apples, Juice, Plastic Free July and This Weeks Delivery Run

By | Farm Gate Stall | No Comments

Hi!

Apples are back. We have both heritage red varieties, and Granny Smith. Plus we’re trialing selling Gran Elly Orchard organic apple juice. $8/1 L bottle. It’s delicious 🙂

This weeks delivery run will be Friday 29th June, 1-2:30pm for orders $40+ in Toowoomba. Place your order by Thursday 28th, 8:30pm if you’d like the Friday delivery. In the school holidays I’ll aim for a morning delivery slot, as this seems to suit people better.

Plastic Free July is almost upon us! Last year we aimed for reusable boxes for veg orders to reduce single use plastic. That’s been working beautifully now people are in the habit of returning boxes.

This year our focus is on using glass instead of plastic for packaging of dried fruit/nuts/seeds. As with boxes, the returning of this packaging for cleaning and future reusing means we can keep costs down for you. If I have to continually buy glass packaging, the cost has to be factored into the produce price.

During Plastic Free July, we’ll be giving a free reusable mesh produce bag with every $25 spent at Birdsong. 🙂 A great way to reduce your plastic use at home.

One product that is hard to package in an eco friendly way is shredded coconut…I’m very open to ideas! 1kg of this coconut is very space-consuming. So glass jars are not really an option. We’ve been using heavy duty plastic packaging, but an eco friendly alternative would be very welcome.

Shalom, Racheal

Market Gardening- What About Food Waste?

By | Market Garden | One Comment

Many of you have seen it on the ABC’s War On Waste series. Or you’ve seen it with your own eyes and through your own research….modern agriculture practices, combined with stringent supermarket criteria, produce a LOT of food waste.

Woolworths made a step in the right direction, with their The Odd Bunch vegetable/fruit selections. We used to buy them before we went organic, and were pleased to see that at least some of the stranger or undersized looking produce items were making it to the shelf!

But what about in the market garden setting? What food waste do we produce, and what do we do with waste?

For starters, we create very little food waste. You can never predict exactly how many lettuce will sell, or how many people will want cauliflower next week, but you can get a rough idea and plant accordingly. Rick puts a decent effort into crop planning (his engineer traits come out in this- you should see the spread sheets!) and as a result our production is fairly well suited to customer demand.

Sometimes there will be a glut. Right now it’s cos lettuce, most likely because it’s winter and people aren’t really eating cold salads and aren’t used to using cos lettuce in any other way. What do we do with the surplus?

Generally one of three things:

-Feed the sheep. The sheep LOVE lettuce, cabbage…even pumpkin as we discovered this week. And as we’ve not had decent rain for months, our paddock is quite depleted of pasture. The surplus lettuce are saving us from buying lucerne for the sheep.

  • Feed the chickens and ducks. Man can not live by bread alone, just as the fowl can’t live bye grain alone. They adore greens, and are daily the recipients of extra or damaged produce. Thanks to all these greens, our eggs have beautiful rich orange yolks, and the fowl are in good health.
  • Return the crop to the soil. I used to struggle with this as it seems like waste, when you’ve been brought up not to waste food! But there’s nothing wasteful about enriching your soil. Sometimes we even grow a green manure crop, purely to mow back into the soil and boost the soil structure and nutrient levels. Presently we have a half a row of overgrown bok choi and mesclun mix. Rick actually likes it when this occurs, because we started out with heavy black clay soil. It was like trying to dig into a big block of modelling clay. Organic matter was desperately needed to remedy this soil, and 18 months later, here we are with completely different soil structure. It makes sense that if you are constantly removing produce from the soil, that you should also be often giving back to the soil.

Rick is also a big fan of doing any trimming of veg (beet greens, brassica leaves etc) at the harvest site, so all those greens go right back to the soil.

The only time food ‘waste’ leaves our property is when I offer it for sale as pet greens, or on odd occasions might sell seconds cabbage for sauerkraut.

A completely different story to mass agriculture isn’t it? And as for undersize or unusually shaped produce, we’re finding that we have less and less of that as our soil improves, but what we do have can still be used. If I have a few cabbages that are undersized, I can ask a customer if they mind having 2 smaller cabbages rather than one big one. Or I can add a few extra beets to the bunch if they’re little. It’s a small enough business that we can talk directly to the customers about their produce and work together to reduce the chance of food waste.