was successfully added to your cart.

Highfields, Gowrie Junction Organic Home Deliveries??

By | Farm Gate Stall | No Comments

We live and farm so close to Gowrie Junction…4kms from the school. And Highfields is just around the corner also.

So, I’m gauging interest for a Highfields and Gowrie Junction delivery run. The same rules would apply as the Toowoomba run…one set delivery slot for orders $40+ and orders would need to be placed by the day before the delivery run.

Anyone interested? If so, please email me racheal@birdsongmarketgarden.com.au and I’ll figure out whether there’s enough interest to go ahead with this.

Apples, Juice, Plastic Free July and This Weeks Delivery Run

By | Farm Gate Stall | No Comments

Hi!

Apples are back. We have both heritage red varieties, and Granny Smith. Plus we’re trialing selling Gran Elly Orchard organic apple juice. $8/1 L bottle. It’s delicious ūüôā

This weeks delivery run will be Friday 29th June, 1-2:30pm for orders $40+ in Toowoomba. Place your order by Thursday 28th, 8:30pm if you’d like the Friday delivery. In the school holidays I’ll aim for a morning delivery slot, as this seems to suit people better.

Plastic Free July is almost upon us! Last year we aimed for reusable boxes for veg orders to reduce single use plastic. That’s been working beautifully now people are in the habit of returning boxes.

This year our focus is on using glass instead of plastic for packaging of dried fruit/nuts/seeds. As with boxes, the returning of this packaging for cleaning and future reusing means we can keep costs down for you. If I have to continually buy glass packaging, the cost has to be factored into the produce price.

During Plastic Free July, we’ll be giving a free reusable mesh produce bag with every $25 spent at Birdsong. ūüôā A great way to reduce your plastic use at home.

One product that is hard to package in an eco friendly way is shredded coconut…I’m very open to ideas! 1kg of this coconut is very space-consuming. So glass jars are not really an option. We’ve been using heavy duty plastic packaging, but an eco friendly alternative would be very welcome.

Shalom, Racheal

Bone Broth Workshop, Wednesday May 30th at Birdsong

By | Farm Gate Stall | No Comments

No doubt just about everyone has heard of bone broth, it’s a hot topic, especially in regard to it’s gut healing capabilities.

We’ve been making it for years, and actually started making it because Rick was trained as a chef back in the day, and when we got married he liked things like real gravy made on real beef stock…and making it seemed a lot more economical (and satisfying) than buying it!

Then as time went on and more and more info came out about the vast chasm of difference in quality between your standard supermarket stock/broth and homemade stock/broth, there was no way we’d go back to buying it.

Last Autumn we held a bone broth workshop, and as the chill of the season sets in again this year, it’s such a lovely time to have a pot of broth on the stove (or in your slow cooker).

We’re holding another bone broth workshop Wednesday May 30th, 1:30pm here at Birdsong (118 Boundary St).

I’ll show you examples of what to include in your broth, how to make it, how to pressure can it (to make the broth shelf stable) and how to make boullion (reduced broth jelly, EXCELLENT option if you want to freeze broth but have limited freezer space).

We can also give you a list of where to source bones, whether fish, beef or lamb.

You will go home with a little starter kit of Birdsong herbs, seasonal produce (suitable for broth), instructions and a jar of broth (likely beef) to try.

Cost: $30. You can either pay on the day (must RSVP first) or you can pay by selecting the class from the webstore and paying online.

To RSVP, email me at racheal@birdsongmarketgarden.com.au by Sunday May 27th.

Beeswax Wraps and Cold Process Soap Making Workshop

By | Farm Gate Stall | No Comments

May at Simple Living Toowoomba…

This month SLT are offering two classes in one, DIY beeswax wraps with Suanne from Green Dandelion, and cold process soap making with me.

If you haven’t heard about beeswax wraps, they’re an eco friendly alternative to glad wrap. Much better looking than glad wrap too! Suanne will even have kits available for sale on the day with the wax/resin mix so you can go home and make your own. Suanne is regularly at local farmer’s markets and the like selling not only her beautiful wraps, but also other ‘green’ solutions for you home.

And soap making, like I’ve said before, is so much easier than you think and can be made with ingredients from the supermarket. No need to order pricey unusual ingredients (unless you want to go down that path). Homemade soap is also very allergy friendly. I have yet to meet a person, no matter how bad the eczema, who reacts to basic homemade soap. I’ll have some soap available for sale on the day.

This class will take place on Saturday 26th May, 9:45am-Midday at 13-15 Blake St, Wilsonton, 4350. It’s going to be capped at about 30-35 participants.

Cost is $5 per adult (need cash as there’s no electronic payment facilities), which is amazing value. Soapmaking will be up first and we’ll start at 10am sharp, so please be on time! Suanne will then start her wraps demonstration at around 11am.

To RSVP, email Michele at simplelivingtoowoomba@gmail.com

Seasonal Mixed Box – A Value Comparison

By | Farm Gate Stall | One Comment

We get both- customers who want specific produce each order, and customers who just want a box of whatever is fresh and seasonal.

One customer, upon taking home her first $50 mixed box, decided to list and weigh every item in her box and find out how the value compared to buying the same items organically at the supermarket. I was really excited by this, it’s one of those things I probably wouldn’t get around to doing at the moment, but am very interested to see the results of.

So I’ve just received the list this customer wrote, and will share it with you so you too can see how our seasonal mixed boxes compare with supermarket buying.

NOTE: Contents of seasonal mixed boxes change frequently, depending on what’s in season and how much of each item we have available.

This customer was not asked to do this, she just happens to be very thrifty and wanted to know for herself what kind of value she was getting.

It’s also worth noting when you buy a seasonal box, I ALWAYS put more than the dollar value you paid in there, ie if you buy a $50 box, I’ll put at least another $5-$10 worth of our produce in there.

Both Coles and Woolworths online were used for her comparisons, as neither supermarket stocked everything in her box from Birdsong. The comparisons are made with Organic produce (except for the eggplant and cucumber, which she could not find organically from supermarkets at the time).

 

Ok, here it is:

Item                                                Supermarket Price     Total

1050g Dutch Cream Potatoes    $4/kg                           $4.20

995g Sweet Potato                        $10/kg                        $9.95

630g Salad Onion                         $7/kg                          $4.45

670g Butternut Pumpkin            $4/kg                          $2.68

1560g Tomatoes                            $17.50/kg                  $27.30

856g Corn, Small Cobs                $14/kg                        $11.97

425g Squash                                  $9/kg                          $3.82

777g Capsicum                              $9/kg                          $6.99

420g Purple Beans                      $18/kg                         $7.56

1305g Zucchini                             $9/kg                           $11.75

954g Eggplant                              $8/kg (non organic) $7.63

1140g Lebanese Cucumber        $5/kg (non organic)  $5.95

700g Beetroot                               $9/kg                           $6.30

808g Carrots                                 $6/kg                           $4.85

30g Herbs                                                                            $3

12.3kg Produce (Equivalent $4.06/kg)      TOTAL: $118.11

 

Wow, I hadn’t realised the price difference would be so huge!

Organic Dried Fruit/Nuts/Seeds/Flours

By | Farm Gate Stall | 4 Comments

As many of you know, we supplement out produce range with some organic dried fruit, nuts, seeds, oils and sometimes flours.

Some of these items, like coconut sugar and pepitas have been selling out fast lately! We’re looking at ordering in more organic pantry items like these soon and we’re open to suggestions. What would you like to see in our web store?

It’s been a while since we’ve had dried fruit, so I’m considering giving organic figs a go. The wholesaler we deal with has a huge variety and if there’s something you’d like to be able to buy through us (and we keep the prices as reasonable as we can), then leave a comment or contact us and let us know your suggestions.

Elderberry and Zanzibar Gem and Caramelised Onion Relish

By | Farm Gate Stall | One Comment

Surplus. It’s something we experience now and then on the farm.

A while back Rick harvested a row of tropea long red onions, which I’ve been enjoying, as for so long onions were the one veg item I still had to buy at the markets! Tropea’s don’t keep as long as traditional varieties, but they do far better in our Toowoomba climate than standard onions. So once harvested, they have a shorter shelf life and to make sure we avoided waste, I made several batches of organic Caramelised Onion Relish. There’s more than we can use ourselves, so it’s been for sale at the farm gate. I’m not going to worry about listing it on the website, but if you’re making an order and would like some, just request it in the comments box of your order. Or email me. it’s $7.50 a jar (approx 380g). The only comparable onion relish I could find that was organic was $12 for 280g!

And Elderberry plants! About 2 years ago we planted 3 elderberry plants around our house tank. Apparently they like it there, as one day I walked out to find about 12 suckers that the mother plants had sent out. So they were potted and tended for several months until they took root, and now they’re available for $10ea. Same deal, they’re available at the farm gate, or you can request one in the comments box of your order. The flowers and berries are wonderful for medicinal remedies and wines. We’ve really enjoyed the elderflower wine. Rick usually isn’t interested in home ferments, but he got stuck into that one!

Some of you may have read the post I wrote a while back about our thriving Zanzibar Gem. When my sister, a horticulturist, told us about how they propagate them at the TAFE and they’re SO slow growing, we didn’t expect to see much change in ours. They’re known for needing almost no attention and infrequent watering. We decided to water it more often, fertilise with organic fish emulsion and it was also exposed to a lot of Classic FM in our loungeroom…and it’s thrived! I’ve had to upgrade the pot twice, and recently have taken cuttings from the original which are now potted up in Rick’s compost (mineral mix) and available for sale. They’re $10ea ($40 at Bunnings) It’s a wonderful plant for indoor air filtration, and looks pretty cool too.

Has anyone else had a zanzibar gem that’s defied the rules? ūüôā

Easter Opening Hours

By | Farm Gate Stall | No Comments

Oops, should have posted these hours sooner!

We had a lovely couple of days off on Friday and Saturday, and are now open today (Easter Sunday) and tomorrow (Easter Monday) from 11am-6pm.

In addition to the produce listed on the web store, we also have yellow-flesh watermelons and some butternut pumpkins. Stock is limited on these, so they won’t be listed online. Just ask us if you’d like one.

Rain at Last!

By | Farm Gate Stall | No Comments

Hi ūüôā

As you may have noticed on the web store, the range of produce is dwindling! There’s lots of crops out there, but until yesterday, we’d had no rain this year. So though we irrigate and the crops are plodding along, they haven’t been able to thrive. Yesterdays storm brought 14mm. A nice start.

The lack of rain isn’t just affecting the crops, it also affects the animals. Our sheep have eaten out their cell, so I let them out into the house yard the other day, completely intending to put them back soon….but I forgot and they ate most of our upcoming lettuce crop. Oops.

And the ducks/chickens…the laying has cut right back! So many birds, so few eggs. But Cinnamon, one of our bantams who was laying, just hatched 5 little chicks, as pictured. So cute, but it’s ducks we’re wanting to breed, not more chooks! And bantams at that (Rick thinks their little eggs are a waste of time). The children are excited though, they love babies.

Rick’s had some contract work happening, so farm work is minimal. But that’s a good thing while we’re waiting on more rain. When the range picks up again, Rick is wanting to add another delivery slot to our week. He goes into town every Wednesday morning to deliver to a restaurant, and could do a few home deliveries right after that (in Toowoomba, after 9:30am Wednesdays). So keep an eye on the website, he plans to add the delivery option as an item that you add to your cart.

I also have a contact in Harristown who already runs a fruit co-op and is willing to be a pickup point for orders. So if you’re in that area and are interested, let me know.

Enjoy your week,

Racheal

 

Our Experiences with Lavender Essential

By | Farm Gate Stall | No Comments
I’ve noticed a great deal of our customers are into alternative healing, and natural living…so I thought I’d share this with you ūüôā
Lavender oil is one of the three oils that we’ve been using for a looong time. Not long after marrying Rick, he relayed to me the account of his mining mate who sustained a nasty hand injury that looked like it needed professional help at a hospital. The friend said, no, he had lavender essential oil, and to just watch how fast the gash healed. He said within 3 days it would be fine. So Rick did watch. And 3 days later, the wound was healing very nicely. No infection and no weeping etc. So we’d started buying lavender from the supermarket and keeping it on hand as we had more and more children, who naturally hurt themselves a lot.
My first chance at really putting lavender to the test was one afternoon when I had a particularly important phone call and the children had gone down to play at the pond. Before long, I’m hearing “MUM! MUM! There’s blood everywhere! Mum!” It was one of those calls that wasn’t easy to put down (a friend in a very emotional state), but when Charlotte was ushered inside, with blood literally pouring out of her finger, I had to tell the caller I had a serious injury to deal with! It turned out Micah had been ‘mowing the lawn’ near the pond with secatares, and Charlotte had stuck her finger right between the blades as he snipped. The result was that half of the tip of her finger was sliced through. I don’t like emergency rooms, and the fact that every time we’ve tried them we wait for hours to often find there’s not much they can do anyway. So I decided to try the lavender oil and bandages. Some bright spark gave us a first aid kit as a wedding gift (long time friend of Rick’s I think), so we had everything we needed. So that was it. I bandaged to stop the bleeding and when it had slowed down enough, dropped some lavender oil on the wound. Lavender speeds healing. I alternated treating the wound with tea tree oil too, as it is very effective at fighting infection. Thankfully it worked. He finger healed, and now, years later, there’s not even a scar. That’s impressive considering how much of her finger was sliced through!
A similar accident occurred about 2 years ago when our toddler went and played with tin sheeting (right before we were about to go out too). He deeply sliced the palm of his hand. I grabbed the lavender and tea tree again…and bandages of course. By now we knew butterfly closures were an item to keep in stock at our home! Two of the friends at the homeschool group we were attending that day were trained nurses, who suggested I take him to hospital for stitches. I drove home, praying about it…keen NOT to go to the hospital. I called Rick and he said to go with the oils. So we did. And once again, between lavender, tea tree and bandages, Jeremiah’s hand healed with no sign of scarring or infection.
Micah used to be our least hygienic child (Charlotte is in fierce competition with him for that title now!), and he contracted school sores. The first time it happened, we put him on antibiotics (the only time I’d ever done that with any of our children!). They left. But then they came back down the track, and this time I’d read that lavender and tea tree could combat school sores. So that’s what we did. I mixed the two oils in a spritzer bottle and sprayed his sores about twice a day. They left. And this time didn’t come back.
Flies really don’t like lavender. As most of you know, we keep sheep. We’ve had constant dog attacks on our flock, and one summer one of our best breeders was almost killed by a tear to the neck from one of the despised wild dogs. You could see inside her neck, it wasn’t pretty. But I hate to have an animal put down if there’s some chance it might recover. So we grabbed the lavender oil. Too much of it actually. You don’t ever need to use much, but we were hurrying to save her and Rick said “Pour it on!” I was too flustered to tell him that would be overkill, so just poured it on. The ewe dropped to the ground, shocked for a moment. But the lavender worked (we bandaged her neck also). It sped the healing, and repelled the flies, which are a threat to injured sheep, as they like to lay maggots in the wool of them. But she lived, never became fly blown and went on to have more twin lambs!
Lavender heals wounds, but what else?
Most of you have probably heard about it’s calming qualities. Especially on babies. When Archie had teething pain, I looked up in Modern Essentials what to try, and they said lavender oil across the jawbone. I did it, and it worked. Other times I’ve placed a drop of lavender on the back of the neck of distressed children, and found it calms them nicely.
One time we popped out the lavender in the park, when one of the children’s friends stepped on a bee and was stung. I put one drop on the bite site and she soon stopped crying and ran off with the others as though nothing had happened.
Lavender is also great for (brace yourself, it’s a long list!): calming agitation, allergies, anxiety, appetite loss, arrhythmia, atherosclerosis, bites/stings, blisters, boils, soothing breast pain, burns, cancer, chicken pox, club foot, concentration, convulsions, crying, cuts, dandruff, depression, diabetic sores, diaper rash, diuretic, dysmenorrhea, exhaustion, fever, gangrene, gas/flatulence, giardia, gnats, grief/sorrow, dry hair, hair loss, hay fever, hernia, herpes simplex, hyperactivity, impetigo, inflammation, insomnia, itching, jet lag, dry lips, mastitis, menopause, mental stress, mood swings, mosquito repellent, muscular paralysis, pain, parasympathetic nervous system stimulation, parkinson’s disease, phlebitis, physical stress, poison ivy/oak, post labour, postpartum depression, rashes, relaxation, rheumatoid arthritis, sedative, seizure, dry skin, skin ulcers, sleep, stress, stretch marks, sunburn, tachycardia, teeth grinding, teething pain, tension, thrush, ticks, leg ulcers, varicose ulcers, vertigo, withdrawal, worms, wounds, wrinkles.

Lavender wholesales at $28 for 15ml and is one of the top 10 oils to have in your home. I keep some in stock for those who are local and don’t have their own account with doterra.

A Higher Frequency

By | Farm Gate Stall | 2 Comments

Hello,
Ever heard of Tainio? Bruce Tainio, of Tainio Technology invented and built a machine called the BT3 Frequency Monitoring System. He wanted to measure the bio-electrical frequencies of soil nutrients and essential oils.

If you can remember back to school science lessons, you would have been told about how everything vibrates. Every element in the periodic table has a specific vibratory frequency.

Humans have a frequency, but it can vary so much depending on what state your health is in. Through measuring these frequencies it was found that a healthy person should have a frequency measuring around 62-68MHz.

But what if it’s less? When your frequency drops to about 58MHz, cold symptoms can manifest.

Flu symptoms start at 57MHz.

Candida at 55MHz

Cancer can begin when the body drops below 42MHz.

The process of dying begins at 25MHz and drops to zero when you’re officially dead.


So how can you change your frequency? First of all, it should be noted that processed/canned food measures 0MHz. It has no life force, the heat treatment has killed it all. It can give you energy, but not life-force.

Fresh herbs measure 20-27MHz

Even dry herbs measure 12-22MHz

Holding a cup of coffee was found to lower a person’s frequency by 8MHz!! And drinking the coffee lowered it by 14MHz.

So eating food that’s fresh as opposed to long-life, will go a long way towards boosting your frequency.


But then there are essential oils too. Tainio tried giving his coffee experiment ‘guinea pig’ a whiff of some quality essential oils after drinking the coffee. The subjects frequency was fully restored within a minute. He tried the same experiment with the coffee again, but left the person to their own devices to see how long restoration of frequency after the coffee would take without the use of essential oils. 3 days it took.

(I told Rick about this, and he can’t bear the thought of giving up coffee, so dabbed himself with peppermint oil which measures at 78MHz, after drinking his coffee!)


This is relatively recent technology and not all oils have been tested. But quality, properly distilled oils from healthy plants have some amazing frequencies. For example:

Rose 320MHz

Helichrysum 181MHz

Lavender 118 MHz

Melissa (lemon balm) 102MHz

Juniper 98MHz

Peppermint 78MHz

Basil 52MHz


And you can benefit from their frequency just by inhaling them!

One of the most important healing modalities of the oils is their ability to lift our bodily frequencies to levels where disease cannot exist” David Stewart Ph.D.


Food for thought…


PS All the above oils mentioned are available through doTerra and can either be ordered through me (I also keep a bunch of them in stock at wholesale prices), or I can set you up with your own wholesale account (no minimum buy required). Just ask if you’re interested.

Just remember that no oil or supplement is a substitute for a wholesome balanced diet. If you want to improve your health, look at your diet and habits first.

Shalom, Racheal

Happy New Year + Specials

By | Farm Gate Stall | No Comments

Happy New Year! We welcomed it in by….harvesting. Surprise, surprise!

By the way, we are open today (New Years Day).

To celebrate the new year, we’ve got some specials for you…

Zucchini $4/kg

Activated Almond meal, insecticide free $12/kg

Tomato 5kg bulk buy, $20

These specials are available while stocks last, or for the next week…whichever comes first ūüôā

Have a lovely new years, and have fun dreaming about your goals for this year…I plan to learn more about herbs. While perusing the Minerals For the Genetic Code book, I noticed herbs are mineral powerhouses…with ppm (parts per million) of various minerals far higher than most other foods. So herbs are going as many dishes as possible!

Birdsong Tidings

By | Farm Gate Stall | One Comment

Hello, hope you all had a lovely Christmas. It was very peaceful here, so good to have a break!

It’s been full-on, with summer crops needing frequent harvesting. I was thinking this arvo, what happened to those morning hours when I used to get extra jobs done? Now the time is spent harvesting and cleaning equipment. But we live seasonally here, so that’s to be expected. I’ve started reading Grow, Hunt, Cook by a guy from NSW. Forgotten his name! But I can totally relate to what he says about living seasonally, and how it means working your but off for three seasons and then taking it easier in the winter…though he lives in a much colder part of the country than us…we can grow year round here…so winter is still a work season. Just not quite as busy as summer.

As many of you know, we have ducks for eggs, and last week we had a beautiful bunch of ducklings arrive. We had a hen incubate the eggs for us…2 hens actually. Lightning, the hen who started incubating, was kicked off the nest by Lavender, my hard-core-broody hen. She’d just hatched some chicks about 2 weeks prior, but obviously was still in the mood to sit, because she kicked Lightning off the nest and took over. That was all good and well until after the ducklings hatched. Our son excitedly told us three ducklings had hatched. We went to have a look, and a fourth was hatching! But by the time I got back out there to check on the progress, a duckling was dead! Bleeding from the back of the skull, and totally lifeless. It was heartbreaking when we’ve waited to long to hatch our own ducklings.

But I didn’t know it was Lavender who was responsible, so I left the other ducklings there while we waited for the next one to hatch. Then on the next check up, another duckling was killed. Same lethal wound to the back of the skull. Then I realised Lavender was the murderer! She has 6 week old chicks that still sleep beside her, and obviously she looked at these new babies and realised they’re no chickens…and started killing them. I felt awful for not getting the ducklings out of there sooner, but I had no idea she’d do that. We’d sold fertile eggs to a guy who had a hen incubate them, and it all went well for him, so I presumed it would be the same for us. Not so. Anyway, there was a 5th egg starting the crack, so I put it under another broody hen who’s far gentler. But she rejected it in the middle of the night, so it went cold and died. ūüôĀ

The good news is that we rescued the two remaining ducklings, who are doing really well. They’re friendly little ones, and love to have someone nearby to play ‘replacement mother.’ They’ll cheep like crazy when they’re lonely, and all we have to do is put them on someone’s lap, or next to the children while they play, and the babies will be happy. So cute.

We’re open again from tomorrow (Wednesday 27th December). As I mentioned to a few people, if we took the week off, we’d have to throw out so produce! The garden is producing heavily right now. Tomatoes especially. I’ve been canning whenever possible (though I’m down to my last few vacola jars now!).

It’s a great time of year to look back at all that you have to be thankful for…